Educational | 23.11.2015

How To Select a Toilet


At some point in our lives, most homeowners are faced with having to buy a new toilet. But gosh, darn, there are so many choices. When you start looking around you’ll see a huge range in pricing. It doesn’t take long to wonder how much you need to spend to get something of quality, because having to fix a leak can be far more costly. The short answer is that you should spend at least $200-300. Spending more gets you more, but don’t spend less.

The Two Most Important Things:

  • Litres per flush
    • You want to have maximum 6 liters per flush.
  • The toilet seat matters
    • Spending a little more on a seat that is a higher quality material, has shape and contours that are comfortable for you is well worth it.

Additional Things to Consider

  • Round vs elongated
    • A round seat toilet takes up less space, so is great for small bathrooms. Some people find an elongated seat to be more comfortable.
  • Toilet height
    • Taller height toilets are more and more becoming the norm. They are easier to get on and off. Having said that, a shorter seat allows for more of a squatting position which is said to have many benefits
  • One piece vs two piece
    • an aesthetic choice
  • Wall mounted
    • A cost premium that gives a very nice look, is space saving and makes for easier cleaning.
  • Location of pipes and drains
    • If you (as opposed to a plumber) are replacing an existing toilet, making sure things line up can be very important. Especially the drain… If you hire a professional, they can worry about this, but be aware there might be some plumbing work required.
  • Mechanics are important
    • Interior design of the toilet will impact the operation and therefore price. While you can’t see the interior design of a toilet, it can have a significant effect on how well the toilet evacuates the waste. Bottom line is if you spend $250-350 or more, this isn’t something that you need to be concerned about.
  • Dual flush technology
    • Some toilets have two flush buttons. One for liquid only, and one for non liquid waste. While a good idea in theory as it saves water, proceed with caution as we’ve found a surprisingly high level of dissatisfaction in the dual flush fixtures. A lot of people say the minimal flush button just doesn’t work well.
  • Colour
    • Different brands have different colour options. Sometimes it’s all in the details!
  • Soft close
    • If you don’t like waking up to the sound of a falling lid in the middle of the night, having soft close might be something you consider.

Finally, make sure you ask about the warranty. Find out if, should you need replacement parts, you can purchase them anywhere that brand of fixture is sold or do you have to go back to the store you made the original purchase from? Some big box stores sell brands that can also be found in any plumbing store, but the specifications for the products and parts are unique to that chain therefore you can’t get parts from anywhere else.

The more you know…